5. When to post

There is an element of trial and error here. When I started The Early Hour, I was publishing content at 5am, so I’d schedule the social media posts promoting that day’s article to go out in the morning. Because I was consistent with this, my followers came to expect this. It’s no surprise, then, that mornings were when I had the most engagement.

You’ll find information online about when is the best time to post on specific platform, eg. ‘According to a Buffer study, the best time to post to Facebook is between 1pm – 3pm on during the week and Saturdays. We also found that engagement rates are 18% higher on Thursdays and Fridays.’

But this doesn’t take into account your specific audience. If you are talking to parents up early with kids, morning is best. If your audience work during the day and use social media in the evenings, that’s the best time to post. So think about who your audience are, when they’re likely to be scrolling on social media (nap-time, mornings, evenings, on the commute etc) and try posting then. If there’s not much traction, trial another time. And then use the in-built stats on each platform to monitor the best time for you to post.

Again, the idea that you need to post a certain amount of times a day is a little more complex. If you have excellent content to put out each day – one/two posts on Instagram or Facebook; up to 10 tweets – go ahead. Daily is great for your followers and for the algorithm. But if you don’t, do it a bit less and make sure each post is really good. Don’t put out content for the sake of it; make every post count. Anna Whitehouse shared an idea for stockpiling content (see point ‘3’ on the next topic)…